Video Update 9: In celebration of Global Tiger Day

The survival of the Malayan Tiger hangs in the balance. Protecting them from direct poaching is a top priority, and requires intensive, regular patrolling in the deep forest. It’s not a job for the faint-hearted, and requires a combination of passion, skills, dedication, and fortitude.

To celebrate Global Tiger Day this 29 July 2020, we’d like you to meet some of our patrollers working on the frontlines of tiger conservation in our Harimau Selamanya project. Set up in 2014, our project has been working with rangers from government agencies such as PERHILITAN, Terengganu State Parks, and the Royal Malaysian Police to reduce poaching, and protect the forest habitats of big cats such as the Malayan tiger in Kenyir, Terengganu.

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Project update 19, photo update 11, video update 6: Project Pteropus phase 1 in review

sheema_esteban_tekek

It’s definitely been a crazy, roller coaster ride for Project Pteropus so far! Time flies when you’re having fun, and before we knew it, we’re already in the third and final year of Sheema‘s PhD. We’re due to start a tiny bit more of fieldwork over the next 3 months, then everything needs to be wrapped up pronto as she’ll be on her way to spend 6 months in Paris this June 🙂

So what has the project achieved so far? Some pretty exciting stuff, as it turns out. Almost all the data are in already, but some still need a bit of time to be analysed. We’ve decided to summarise our results so far into an interim report, which is why you’re getting this bumper post that serves as a compilation of updates, photos AND videos all at the same time! 😀

Also, HUGE thanks to Bat Conservation International for awarding us a small grant in September last year. Without this funding we definitely wouldn’t have been able to achieve as much as we have, and we’re deeply grateful. Click on the BCI logo below to find out more about applying for their small grants:

BCI logo

Meanwhile, here’s what we’ve found out up to this point (if you’re just interested in the images and don’t need to read through the information, just scroll down further!): Continue reading

Publication update 12: Indigenous rights matter!

Temiar children playing in RPS Banun, an Orang Asli resettlement in the Belum-Temengor Forest Complex.
Temiar children playing in RPS Banun, an Orang Asli resettlement scheme in the Belum-Temengor Forest Complex.

There was a time when people used to think that saving the environment was all about – well, the environment. Some people even confused it with ‘saving the trees’, ‘saving the animals’, or ‘saving wildlife’. Many conservationists nowadays know better. We’ve learnt that the environment has been shaped and nurtured by the many indigenous and local people who revere it, care for it and ultimately depend on its resources for their survival. Focusing on saving the environment, or wildlife, alone is meaningless if we don’t take into account the forest-dependent or sea-dependent peoples who are critical in ensuring nature’s well-being – and for whom, in turn, nature is a critical part of their lives. Sometimes they can be a part of the problem, but often they can be part of the solution too. This is why more conservationists need to start recognising the important role played by indigenous peoples in conservation, and also start considering and incorporating indigenous peoples in conservation efforts. Continue reading